Exhibition of the venerated image in the monastery of Santa Chiara in Italy.

The image of the Divine Child Jesus venerated in the monastery of Santa Chiara in Italy will be exhibited in an exhibition from March 7 to June 4 in Cambridge, England.

The presence of the piece of sacred art was made news by the providential survival of the image to the earthquake that suffered the region of Italy where it was and that caused the total destruction of the monastery in which it was conserved.

The beautiful image was elaborated for Santa Camila Bautista, a religious who took the habits after being a princess and received private revelations in which the Holy Child Jesus appeared to her. This image is venerated every year with a kiss on the feast of the Epiphany by hundreds of devotees who make a pilgrimage to the monastery.

The exhibition Madonnas and Miracles (Ladies and Miracles) of the Fitzwilliam Museum brings together numerous pieces of sacred art created for private devotion. “Gathering a wealth of objects, including jewelry, ceramics, books, sculptures and paintings, the exhibition invites us to a domestic sphere that was charged with spiritual significance,” explains the museum in the official presentation of the exhibition.

“Bringing materials from all over the Italian peninsula and putting fine works of art together with humble and everyday objects, Madonnas and Miracles offers a lively encounter with the spirituality and domestic life of the Renaissance,” the presentation added.

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“The exhibition seeks to transform” our understanding of a period that is frequently presented as intensely worldly and secular “to achieve” a new appreciation of the relationship between the material and the divine. ”

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